6 years ago #1
Valtellina
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Hi everyone, I'm brand new to the site and need help please!!!

I have bottled 2 wines using Mosti Mondiale's Alljuice kits ( one Cab, and one Barolo )

I decided to open both ( VERY prematurely ) just to see how they are developing. The Cab was bottled 3 months ago, and the Barolo was bottled 3 weeks ago.

Both wines appear to have the same problem...once I pour them out there is a significant amount of tiny stubborn bubbles. The Cab pretty much tastes like Red wine vinegar ( so, I assume that one's a loss ) The Barolo actually has some fruit flavor, and is much better than the Cab, but still has the bubbles.

Did I not de-gas sufficiently? I really degassed on both, but more so on the Barolo and there is a little less bubble content. Also, during bottling for both I know there was some unavoidable air exposure.


Thank you,


Val

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6 years ago #2
DGreene
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Val the cab may not be a loss, new wine does not taste anything like finished product. Sounds like you bottled a little early tho, may not have degassed enough or waited it out, or possibly you still had some residual sugar in the must. Its possible that you had some spoilage in the cab but honestly I made the same mistake in the first three kit wines that I made! Bottled too early that is, in fact the first time there was still stuff floating in it although it looked good when I did it.

Take more time. Wait it out. Open a cab in a few months (6) and see what you have. Sure you will have bubbles. Try pouring a glass, then using one of those wine saver things that pumps out the air, they work well for mistake wine defizzing.

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6 years ago #3
Valtellina
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DGreene, thank you very much for the quick response/advice. I will follow your suggestion and see how things go.

Thanks again,


Val

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6 years ago #4
OzWino
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I'm not completely familiar with kit wines, so will briefly run you through the reasons for unwanted bubbles in bottled wine made from fresh grapes.
This is principally because malolactic fermentation (MLF) has not been completed prior to bottling. All grapes have malic acid in them which will eventually be converted to lactic acid by naturally occurring bacteria (called lactic acid bacteria). The reaction releases carbon dioxide... hence the bubbles in your wine. If you do not allow MLF to finish before you bottle you will need to make sure you have plenty of PMS in the bottle and a relatively low pH or it will start naturally when the wine warms.

Degassing wine?? Well, other than when preparing wine for lab analysis... I'm not sure why you would attempt that. The wine will naturally lose CO2 over time in the storage container and when you undertake your rackings. I think you need to have more patience and leave the wine longer before bottling (minimum 6 months).
I know that sounds a long time, but if you make wine continually for a while you will have sufficient stock to not worry about wine shortages. And it will pay off in the long run!

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6 years ago #5
DGreene
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Yeah that is the best way. Most of the kit wines you buy Oz have instructions that say to stir the **** out of the wine for about 6 min total while adding sulfite and sorbate and clarifiers IE chitosan or isinglass etc.. then bottle in about 3-4 weeks. They are geared for early drinking, never have seen a kit that has any kind of MLF ferm built in, they just are not that complex.

They all taste like vinegar (according to my girlfriend anyway) when you open early, but to me they taste like very young wine. Years of being right about not making vinegar support me on that! (thank god for that)

Oz what do you know about using a bubble stone to micro oxygenate wine?

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6 years ago #6
Valtellina
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OzWino, thank you for the reply!

I followed the instructions pretty closely regarding de-gassing ( which the manufacturer reccomends ) and I actually left the wine in the carboy for considerably longer than they suggest. I think the problem may be insufficient sulfites which did not fully stop the fermentation process. It's not enough to pop a cork, but enough to create co2 in the bottle....thoughts?

Thank you,


Val

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6 years ago #7
DGreene
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Val it's entirely possible he is right and you had an MLF going. You don't actually have to add anything it can just happen. In fact the first wines were made with natural yeast, they just let it sit around until it started fermenting.

In a kit wine you don't want to use the sulfites to stop the fermentation, you want it to stop on its own. This can vary in time depending on sugars and yeast and temp... etc. All sorts of things can effect it. With kits the best bet is to use your hydrometer. Write the starting SG (specific gravity) and check it for the first week or so, stirring once a day with a sanitized spoon for the first couple days. Lid loose on the primary. Check spec grav and when it reaches 1.15 to 1.10 rack it into your secondary and let it sit there with an airlock for a month. Kits say 2 weeks. BS it takes longer, you get a better wine if you let it ferment to dryness. The SO2 is for spoilage and O2 protection mostly. It would stop an MLF probably though. The amounts they give you with a kit are usually signifigantly lower amount than there is in commercial wine, I usually add more but then again I usually add a grape pack if I feel like making a kit so I like to store it longer anyway.

OZ is way better at the chemisty of the stuff, with real grapes anyway, so.... maybe he can shed some more light on this.

Also it might be some other spoilage bacteria in there causing the problem. Who knows. Give it a month and taste it again. Kits are made to drink early. If the taste gets better but the bubbles drive you nuts use it to top up your carboy on the next batch.

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6 years ago #8
OzWino
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DGreene wrote:


Oz what do you know about using a bubble stone to micro oxygenate wine?


Hey DG, regarding the microx... well i think it is a great option for home winemakers who don't have the volumes or cash to use barrels. One of the first wineries I worked at was a huge producer of bulk cheap-**** wines and one of my jobs was going from tank to tank pumping oxygen into the reds after pressing. It really is amazing how it softens a wine in a short period of time. I can't remember how much I was adding as it was ages ago, but I think you'll find about 1ml/L/month is about as much as you'd use (and depends on the temperature of your wine as well).

Most wineries will only really use it straight after pressing though... before MLF.

Of course to do it you'd need to invest in an oxygen tank, regulator and aeration stone
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6 years ago #9
DGreene
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Cheaper than a barrel! Here anyway. Hey our wine club just racked 5 barrels, bottling June 28th.

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6 years ago #10
tonyyy_11111
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i dont know about mosti but most all juice kits you pay a good amount of money for and they are not made for a quick drinking wine ..but allowed to age will end up a better product .. find a nice cool spot somewhere and forget about them for another six months and see how they developed . if you wanted an early drinker your vendor should of directed you to a product that would work with your time table . if you want an early drinker mezza luna red , trinity ,and luna rossa are three by w.e and they are very popular .i dont know what is available in your area . i had an inexpensive kit, when opened within 5 months had a slight fizz on the tounge and it went away with time .

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6 years ago #11
Valtellina
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Thank you for the input...I know I jumped the gun a bit! : )

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5 years ago #12
Adrienne
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Hi, Why would you want to stop the fermentation process? You want all the sugar to convert to ethanol. Maybe that's the problem, the yeast are still converting the sugar to ethanol while in the bottle.
ciao

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3 years ago #13
ryan junor
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am ryan from trinidad the caribbean .. now i made mine home made wine ,, like fruit grapes , suger , 1 pack yeast water . now 6 rum bottles to 1 pack yeast standard rum bottles . and set for 21 day .. after that i bottled them . after like 3 day i open one , bottle , and like their was gas and bubbles . its not smelling bad or tasting spoil . i want to know why is that , this is the first time that happened ..

email me <email> please can any one x plain

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3 years ago #14
bob1
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it usually takes 6 months for the gas from fermenting to leave the wine. But unless it is under an airlock it cant leave it.

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