3 years ago #1
ron
Guest

is the wine safe to drink or is there something that I can do to stop the mold?

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3 years ago #2
bob1
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That is what the campden tabs are for. Give it a dose of metabisulphite and there should be no mold. Also the ABV being above 10% should prevent this. Almost sounds like you did not complete a full fermentation.

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3 years ago #3
j
Guest

What I did not say is my wine was ready to bottle. The amount is 5gal. How many camdon tablets do I add.
Thanks

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3 years ago #4
bob1
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I definitely did not say you were ready to bottle. I do not think your wine finished fermenting. If it has mold I personally would dump it. But 5 tabs or 1/4 tsp should kill mold. Did you check the sg when you started and after it finished secondary.

If it is just starting to ferment you will see little spots that look like mold but are not.

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3 years ago #5
ron
Guest

Hi Bob and thanks for your help. I did check the sg at the start and at the end of fermentation, it has completely finished. I have racked it twice already and the only thing that I did not do is add Camden tablets each time. Also, I was telling you that I was about to bottle it when I noticed the mold not that you were saying that I could bottle it. I looked at my notes and I done all the prep work correctly and followed the recipe to the tee. It had completely fermented in eight days, I racked it on July 2nd and again on Sept 4th and there were no mold. Last week when I checked it the mold was visible. Should I add the Camden tablets or just throw it out and start over?

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3 years ago #6
bob1
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so do you see something floating on top of it? or maybe some foam on side of glass where wine meets bottle dried that resembles mold sometimes. I also cant remember but there is something that can grow across the top of finished wine, its been a long time but remember reading something about it. The cure was to get it off the top so you could get siphon through surface with minimal contact and giving it a suphite racking. I think they gave it a higher dose also.

I will look around and see what I find. I dont think mold will grow on wine with sulphite and alcohol content above 8%. But I have been wrong before.

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3 years ago #7
bob1
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now I am confused there are 2 post missing. Did you see my last post

Flowers of Wine: Small flecks or blooms of white powder or film may appear on the surface of the wine. If left unchecked, they grow to cover the entire surface and can grow quite thick. They are caused by spoilage yeasts and/or mycoderma bacteria, and if not caught at first appearance will certainly spoil the wine. If caused by yeast, they consume alcohol and give off carbon dioxide gas. They eventually turn the wine into colored water. The wine must be filtered at once to remove the flecks of bloom and then treated with one crushed Campden tablet per gallon of wine. The saved wine will have suffered some loss of alcohol and may need to be fortified with added alcohol (brandy works well) or consumed quickly. If caused by the mycoderma bacteria, treat the same as for a yeast infection. The Campden will probably check it, but the taste may have been ruined. Taste the wine and then decide if you want to keep it. Bacterial infections usually spoil the wine permanently, but early treatment may save it.

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3 years ago #8
ron
Guest

Yes I did see all of your posts and I also noticed that they are missing. The mold looks like globs of oil floating on top.

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3 years ago #9
bob1
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this is what I was originally remembering

Oiliness or Ropiness: The wine develops an oily look with rope- like treads or strings appearing within it. It pours slowly and thickly with a consistency similar to egg whites, but neither its smell nor taste are effected. The culprit is a lactic acid bacterium and is only fatal to the wine if left untreated. Pour the wine into an open container with greater volume than required. Use an egg whip to beat the wine into a frothiness. Add two crushed Campden tablets per gallon of wine and stir these in with the egg whip. Cover with a sterile cloth and stir the wine every hour or so for about four hours. Return it to a sterile secondary and fit the airlock. After two days, run the wine through a wine filter and return it to another sterile secondary. Again, this problem, like most, can be prevented by pre- treating the must with Campden and sterilizing your equipment scrupulously.

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1 year ago #10
happy
Guest

so what should I do with the wine?

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9 months ago #11
mini
Guest

my wine has mold on top. Is it safe to drink.

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9 months ago #12
bob1
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how old is the wine? How where you storing it?

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