5 years ago #1
prmonty
Guest

I just started a 6 gallon batch of elderberry wine. Over the past few weeks I only harvested the truely ripe berries, not to say that a few less than fully ripe may have gotten by. Not a stem at all, but after preparing the must, I noticed a greenish film on the sides of the fermenter, my stirring spoon, and everything else juice came in contact. Juice is extremely dark, pleasing to the eye and taste great. I don't know if this is a common problem or what, as to I have read a few tidbits about this problem. I did start the fermentation process last night and by this morning it has started. However, I'm not sure if I want to continue or dump. I think this film would make it impossible to clean the inside of a glass carboy. And will this film cause any health concerns? Any thoughts?

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5 years ago #2
bob1
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common check post. Goo Be Gone or something like that is supposed to work. With the mango I used time and elbo.

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5 years ago #3
tom from kansas
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liquid cooking oil will remove the green residue from the primary fermenter, usually doesn't carry over to the secondary.

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3 years ago #4
ron kohler
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I'm not sure about the film. I'm on my 4th or 5th day of the same process but haven;t seen anything of any film. The staining that appeared on the inside of the carboy came out on my first cleaning when I did the 5 gal batch of blackberries and so I assume it will now also. as for the film. I'm lost there but doubt you have anything to worry about assuming you used camden tabs and had everything else cleaned well.
ron

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3 years ago #5
ron kohler
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bob1...really? goobegone? inside the plastic carboy? I'd be a tad afraid of that unless you know something I don't. I'm a partner in the cleaning business and I'd be skeptical about using anything strong inside of plastic that I am making wine in but thats just me.
Ron

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3 years ago #6
bob1
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Ron notice the post I said I used elbow grease for mine. Another member reported the goo bee gone.

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3 years ago #7
trevor
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For what its worth, I find that using boiling water when cleaning gets rid of a lot of things - even that rock hard crystal deposit that you sometimes get with grapes

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3 years ago #8
prmonty
Guest

Actually, after primary fermentation was done, just a little spray cooking oil was able to clean the primary...As for the 6 gal. carboy, just a little goo around the neck, easily wiped away after first racking. A year later I have the best dry elderberry wine. So good with a nice juicey steak that it'll make ya wanna slap yer momma. Unfortunately I only have 15 bottles left, so I only drink it on occassions of with company. All the elderberries this year were eaten still green by the birds :~( So I have eight gallons of blackerry and fixin' to make some pear. Enjoy!

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3 years ago #9
ron kohler
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I'm hoping I also end up with some dry elderberry wine. I still have plenty in the freezer and just may dig out some of it and let it thaw and see how well it comes off the stems and maybe even make another gallon behind this one. Forgive me but what did you say you did to ensure it would be a dry wine?
Ron

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3 years ago #10
bob1
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He started with an sg close to 1.090 and used a yeast that has med to high tolerance to alcohol and thats it.

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3 years ago #11
ron kohler
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ohhhhhhhh ok....so what;s that yeast called? So I'm getting that differnet kinds of yeast can give you a dryer or sweeter wine, eh?
Ron

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3 years ago #12
ron kohler
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permonty...I, also, just started some elderberry wine but they were picked in the wild and bitter to the taste right off the bush. am wondering if you experience any bitterness in your elderberry and if not what you do to prevent that?
Ron

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3 years ago #13
prmonty
Guest

Hi,

I used only the ripest berries, I would think that the lighter purple ones would be bitter 'cause I noticed while picking them that even th purple ones had clear juice in them. Only the fully ripe berries(almost black) had the purple juice and were sweet, although not supersweet, but the sugar will take care of that. I hope you have good luck with your wine. Elderberries make a great wine. That was in 2010. This year for some reason the birds wiped out every elderberry i could find before they were even ripe. I did however start 8 gallons of wild blackberry in august and I have 6 gallons of pear I started tgis weekend...Cant wait.

By the way, I was just reading your other post on this subject. I noticed you said you were gonna thaw some berries and see how they fall off the stem. Try this...Leave all your clusters frozen in the bags, shake the hell out of them, scoop out a couple cups at a time and pour them on a 2 x 4 plywood board at a slight decline, The board should have 2 inch sides, funneled down on the end and a removable piece straight across the bottom. The larger berries will roll down to the bottom the little green ones if there are any, will roll slowly and the stems will stay at the top of the board. At the bottom, sort through and pick out any lighter ones, then remove bottom center piece and push berries off into a bucket or bag. I did this and refroze them in gallon bags until I had enough for a batch. This worked awesome. Not an original idea...saw it somewhere online.

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3 years ago #14
bob1
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Nice how about a blog on it. Pic and all. Everyone talks about this, Show some pics to help out. I think it would make a nice blog.

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3 years ago #15
ron kohler
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I'll try that but maybe will gently lift out a bunch and try a smaller scale at first in another bag. The reason is I feel with them all being in the freezer and awful lot of stems will also crunch so may try another bunch just removing the bulk of the stems first. I sure have enough frozen to sample differnet ides. If all were out of the bag I could probably make 25 gallons,..LOL
Ron

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3 years ago #16
ron kohler
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Bob1,
If I have sucess at any of this I'll do a blog on the successful one. Or permonty can do it also.
Ron1

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3 years ago #17
Mike
Guest

Hi, I'm Mike and I just finished a five gallon batch of elderberry wine. It does develop that stickey stuff and it isn't something that is a problem except that it was hard to clean up until i got some of that percarbonate and it disolves the green blobs. Mike

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3 years ago #18
bob1
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Thanks. so the oxzy clean cleaned it up fine.

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3 years ago #19
Mike
Guest

Hi, I made elderberry and I picked my berries on the third week of August, the berries are mostly ripe in our region at that time. Don't rush your picking time and the berries will make better wine. You want the most sweet berries to eliminate the bitter taste in your wine. I live in Ohio. The berries are at their best in last week of August. Mike

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3 years ago #20
vinman
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Welcome Mike!

What part of Ohio are you from?

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3 years ago #21
Mike
Guest

Hi Vinman, I'm from the Rogers area in Columbiana County. A small village on Sr 7. My place is between Rogers and Negley Ohio on Sr 154.
This is my first experience at making wine. I have Elderberry, Black Raspberry, and
Strawberry bottled now and have Pineapple,Blueberry and Lambrusco still in the carboys. All of mine are from fruit except the lambrusco which I bought the juice from a supplier with all the engridents in it.
I hear that you are supposed to wait a couple months before drinking this stuff but I opened one of each and tried it. Its really good! Don't know why anyone would want to wait.Might be because they have a large supply already made from last year??? Already have friends who want to try some! Sound familiar?

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3 years ago #22
bob1
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Yep Mike, when the word is out that there is wine and keged beer at the house you find plenty of friends.

Cheers

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