5 years ago#1
Guest
Guest

I have a thin white film on top of wine in the carboy? What is it? Is it bad?

Answer
5 years ago#2
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

Might just be from the yeast. Is it fermenting at this point or aging or what? What kind of wine is it?

Reply
5 years ago#3
Umm
Guest

We pressed about 3 weeks ago, added potassium metabisulfate and it is in the carboy with airlock. A few days ago we noticed the film. There is about a half inch of lees in the bottom of the carboy. There is no strange odor to it. It smells grapey.

Reply
5 years ago#4
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

Ok I am going to make 2 assumptions, one is that you crushed grapes and did a primary fermentation, the second is that you did transfer to the carboy and finished the fermentation (secondary fermentation) in there under an airlock before you added the sulfite.

Sometimes you get a yeast film on the wine. The fact that you added sulfite most likely means that anything else in there is not going to grow IE mold etc. If we can get OZ to weigh in on this we might get a more concise answer but I am pretty sure you are ok, but you might want to rack it off the lees just in case something funky is going on. I'll PM OzWino for you.

Reply
5 years ago#5
OzWino
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 206
Votes: 7

It sounds like you've got mycoderma floating on the surface. This is basically a mixture aerobic bacteria/fungus/yeast that will eventually spoil your wine if you don't do something about it quickly! The microorganisms in the film will pretty rapidly oxidise ethanol into acetaldehyde. Vinegar producers love the stuff but it's really something we want to avoid in wines. It's pretty rare to have it occur during winemaking, but a combo of various factors can result in favourable conditions for its development (eg. high dissolved oxygen, high pH, low SO2)

Sounds like you have caught it early in it's development, so no harm done... YET.

If the film is near the top of a carboy, I think the best method is to scoop it with a spoon and then wipe the edges with a clean cloth. or you could try using a syringe to suck out the film. I would be hesitant in recommending a racking, as the film breaks up easily and will sink to the bottom, making it impossible to get out without filtration (which is obviously an option you could consider).

Once you have removed it make sure the carboy is topped and spray the surface liberally with a 10% sulfite solution. Ensure you maintain your free SO2 levels in the wine to about 40-45ppm which is higher than normal, but in your case recommended

Reply
4 years ago#6
Glenn
Fresh Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 1
Votes: 0

It could also be air mold because there is air getting into the container. To check whether or not the wine is ruined, take a swig. If it does not taste good, spit it out.

Reply
2 years ago#7
Jenny
Guest

Hi. The mulberry wine I prepared was racked for a month. Fermentation has already taken place. Ive siphoned it by now twice. But the wine tastes almost like vinegar and there was that white film on top too. What do I do? Totally confused. Its my first time on this Mulberry wine.
Please do tell me what to do now. I hate to see it all go.

Reply
2 years ago#8
bob1
Wiz
Blogs: 19
Forum: 6,495
Votes: 91

Fermenting makes some vinegar. You really want to limit it by keeping the wine cool while fermenting. However your wine is really young. Did you add some potassium sulphite 1/16 - 1/8 tsp. As far as the film the may still be fermenting and some CO2 is still pushing some pulp and yeast up. After adding the suphite it needs to set for about 2 or 3 months in a cool dark spot. Hopefully it all comes together. You may in the end need to add some more sulphite along with some Potassium Sorbate and then you can add some sugar to it to help it taste better. But if the vinegar taste continues after that there is not to much you can do. Checking the PH also would be in order here make sure it is 3.2 - 3.4.

Reply
2 years ago#9
Jenny
Guest

The pulp has all been removed. I did put the KMS, but it still happened that way. Right now Ive just removed some wine n added more sugar to it. Hopin the taste would change. Is it ok.
Besides that wine, just today I noticed in the orange wine I prepared. Its been racking for 3 months. I just siphoned it a month back. Just today I checked one of the bottles and noticed flies in it. How does that happen.

Reply
2 years ago#10
bob1
Wiz
Blogs: 19
Forum: 6,495
Votes: 91

you need to look at your air locks. I live in an are that is very susceptible to tornadoes. This is why I prefer the 3 piece air lock . It will let them through but not like the singe "S" type. What I am getting to here is that atmospheric pressure changes cause the carboy to pull air in and push it out. It sometimes can be so quick it will suck an airlock dry in seconds. but most of the time on a three piece air lock you can see them floating sand can change them out.

Young wine is tart like vinegar. Wine processed in a carboy will be really dry and we have to use a sweetning process for it.

What happened to your pic?

Reply
2 years ago#11
Jenny
Fresh Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 1
Votes: 0

oops just dissap.....

thnx for the info. ill wait now for another one month n let u know. anywaz whatever happens, Im not givin up.

one more quest... is it okay to keep wine for 2 months in a plastic bottle.

Reply
2 years ago#12
bob1
Wiz
Blogs: 19
Forum: 6,495
Votes: 91

As long as it is food grade plastic. Look for a triangle with a number in it. There needs to be a 1 inside the triangle.

Reply
1 year ago#13
Chefniagara
Guest

I am making vinegar from beer and have a white mould on top of the mother which I suspected was pediococcus

Does this look ok

Reply
1 year ago#14
Chefniagara
Guest

I am making vinegar from beer and have a white mould on top of the mother which I suspected was pediococcus

Does this look ok

Reply
1 year ago#15
john mattera
Guest

have white particles on top of wine in 5 gallon

Reply
1 year ago#16
Glenn
Guest

It is probably air mold. I made a bottle of Muscadine wine one time and had the same problem. Probably because the top was not sealed tight enough. You can just remove it and drink it. It will not make you sick. It may cause your wine have a slight vinegar taste. Mine did so I threw it away only because I did not like the taste. I should have saved it and drank it when I had an upset stomach because vinegar is a good healthful remedy for upset stomach.

Reply
1 year ago#17
trevor
Champion
Blogs: 22
Forum: 1,784
Votes: 35

As mentioned earlier in this post ... how old is it? What stage have you reached? What wine is it?
It may just be yeast working

Reply
7 months ago#18
Vince
Guest

2 months,secondary filtered twice, elderberry

Reply
By entering this site you declare you are 21 or older, you read and agreed to its Terms, Rules & Privacy and you understand that your use of the site's content is made at your own risk and responsibility.
Copyright © 2006 - 2015 Drinks Planet