How to make fruit wine clear up

Mindy avatar
6 years ago #1
Mindy
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Hello, I thought I saw it on here but now I can't find it.
My wine just isn't very clear, I've racked it and racked it.
The first batches were foggy but I think it's because I used waaaay too much yeast, this time it's still foggy tho!
Is there anything I can do to help it clear up?

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WineNot avatar
6 years ago #2
WineNot
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Try using Bentonite. You shouldn't just add bentonite directly to your wine or must. Instead, you should hydrate it first. This can be a bit tricky if you don't do it correctly, you'll just end up with water and a glob of "mud." I use about half a cup of hot water, and then very slowly, as I'm stirring the water, pour the bentonite into the water. Stirring vigorously will help to ensure a more uniform mixture of bentonite and water, which can then be poured into your must or wine. Since your adding bentonite post fermentation it will eventually sink to the bottom with some particles, but possibly not all, so when it is added after the completion of fermentation, the wine should be stirred for several days in order to recirculate. 10 to 15 grams, or about 3 teaspoons for a 5 (6 US) gallon carboy of wine is probably just fine.

Good Luck.

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bob1 avatar
6 years ago #3
bob1
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mindy how old is the wine and what is it some may take 3 months or longer

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Mindy avatar
6 years ago #4
Mindy
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blueberry and apple, they're both 3-4 months old.. i think the issue was i used waaaaay too much yeast.

i have strawberry, cherry and blueberry fermenting now, they're all very cloudy but I'm hopeful they'll clear up.

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bob1 avatar
6 years ago #5
bob1
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yea that is a little time they should start clearing on up. Did you add Pectic enzyme at begining of fermentation?

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DamageInc. avatar
6 years ago #6
DamageInc.
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ya i would wait a bit. to add something to clear it up is some extra chemical or work in my book.

im sure if u research it u will get your answer.

gl and cheers

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Destinyrae_99 avatar
6 years ago #7
Destinyrae_99
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Is it a pectin haze? Sometimes if you just wait it out, things will clear. Wine likes to do it's thing. What all did you use in the recipe...sg readings?

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Mindy avatar
6 years ago #8
Mindy
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no, i have never used a pectic enzyme. should I be? I'm only making 1 gallon batches.

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DamageInc. avatar
6 years ago #9
DamageInc.
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sure u can add pectic enzyme on gallon batches. some recipes call for it.

all your musts are different fruits and cloudy so it does sound like the excessive yeast could be the problem.

make sure your wine is in a very quite dark place.

gl

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Destinyrae_99 avatar
6 years ago #10
Destinyrae_99
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1/2 tsp pectin enzyme per gallon helps clear pectin haze. Have you tried the bentonite? Bentonite has a negative static charge which drags positive charged particulates to the bottom. Sparkolloid, which is diatomaceous earth and polysacharides, reduces proteins and adds brilliance. It works great as a follow up to the bentonite.
For each gallon use 1 level teaspoon and 3 ounces of water in a saucepan, bring to a simmer or 30 minutes-stir often don't allow mixture to burn-add more water if necessary.
Add mixture to wine while it is still hot. Add very SLOWLY and STIR until the mixture is blended throughout the wine. Let the wine set for 2-4 weeks or until it has cleared. Siphon off, leaving sediment behind.
Another option is Isinglass...1/8 teaspoon per gallon.

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Mindy avatar
6 years ago #11
Mindy
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wow, you sure know your stuff!

thanks for the advice, if these three batches don't clear up I'll try that.

Is it ok to try it after i rack it a time or two?

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bob1 avatar
6 years ago #12
bob1
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Mindy dont just start racking but I would add the pectic enzyme in at next racking. You should be in the middle of a racking right now Dgreen needs to chime in on this. I dont see why you cant add it now if one was careful. But to be safe wait another month or two . If it dosn,t clear add it at that racking.Keep your racking now at 2 - 3 month intervals. You may need an extra racking the idea is to try to do it in 3 or 4.

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Destinyrae_99 avatar
6 years ago #13
Destinyrae_99
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Believe it or not, isinglass work better if you leave the sediment behind and just stir it in. Yes, you can try, but OZWino will probably say you are overhandling the wine... Sounds like you have your hands full already (with the yeast)!Keep an eye on it-watch the sediment as the yeast dies, rack and wait. Apple and pear wines sometimes have a pectin haze that if you didn't use some form of pectin enzyme it can be stubborn to clear. Patience and waiting, darling.

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DGreene avatar
6 years ago #14
DGreene
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Mindy-
If your wine is still fermenting, even if it's fermenting a little, it will stay cloudy. Give it some more time. Destinyrae is right the isinglass works well but it will drop a ton of color out of the wine. Winenot had a better idea with the bentonite. Time is still going to be your best clarifier.. well time and gravity that is. If you decide to use bentonite, mix it up very very well in BOILING water or hot distilled water. You do not want to introduce oxygen to the wine, and the heat helps the bentonite to ionize. This is what makes it work, it has a positive charge and attracts the particles in the wine, and when they clump up they fall to the bottom. Definitely wait until the wine is COMPLETELY done fermenting to rack the wine off the lees, and then I would consider waiting a month or two before you decide to add any finings of any kind IE bentonite or isinglass. Add sulfite when you rack it once it's done fermenting, and if you plan on adding potassium sorbate add it at the same time.

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DGreene avatar
6 years ago #15
DGreene
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Oh and if you do decide on bentonite PM me and I will talk you through it, but basically you want to put it in a strong bottle with some bentonite and shake the **** out of it until its a slurry, then let it cool down overnight before you add it.

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Mindy avatar
6 years ago #16
Mindy
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got it, thanks guys!

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5 years ago #17
Tony
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Plain unflavored gelatine.. for a gallon about a 1/4 of a packet.. honestly.. just put it in your jug... shake the **** out of it.. put either in a nice cool.. place or even the fridge..people say it strips a bit of flavor.. ect.. but not really all that much.. worth it to me some times to clear out stubborn wine

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4 years ago #18
Tony, K wines
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I have had wine take as much as 12 weeks to clear, gravity will do the work, just rack and leave it alone. We dont necessarily need to be smart to make wine, just patient.

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WineNot avatar
4 years ago #19
WineNot
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This is an old thread Tony. Thanks for the help though.

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avier101 avatar
2 years ago #20
avier101
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This might an old thread but it is definitely informative for people seeking wine knowledge. I was in need of this information and I'm thankful I didn't have to wait for people to answer me. This great information was here to read already. Everyone had great ideas. The gelatin idea was a good idea for people who cant readily get to a home brew shop. I know its been years since most people posted but the information is still being sucked up. Thank you all.

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2 years ago #21
Kath
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Your'e right - information is still being sucked up. I only started making wine about a month ago and now I looking at information on the next step so thanks for that tip sounds cheaper than the chemicals.

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2 years ago #22
Steph
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This is a brilliant hive of info. I have marrow and squash wine which refuses to clear. Tried pectin but no joy. I have gelatin in cupboard so am gonna have a go. Thanks guys.

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2 years ago #23
Wayne
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All of these methods work. Another method is called "cold crashing."
I've used it successfully for beer and wine clearing. In your internet search engine look-up "Cold Crashing" and learn about it. It's a good method to add to your abilities.

It is easy, requires a little patience and has always yielded great results.

Expect to rack off the clear wine more than once. I recommend using a racking cane that is "J" hooked so that the last 1/2 inch or so is sacrificed, along with the lees. A "V" bottomed fermenter that will fit in a spare refrigerator that is capable of being turned down to near freezing, is the absolute best way for the serious home vintner to accomplish "Cold Crashing". (take out all of the shelving) You can easily open the valve and drain the lees off of the vessel and set it aside in a smaller vessel to clear separately.

Good Luck!

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bob1 avatar
2 years ago #24
bob1
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yep that works exactly what I do for beer. ferment 7 days then crash for 14. rack it to keg.

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1 year ago #25
Jim Yost
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Mindy,

I used to have problems with wine not clearing until I found out about using twice the recommended amount of pectic enzyme the recipe calls for. Since I started doing that I haven't had any more batches to not clear. Another thing I've discovered is that the wine does better if you wait 24 hours after adding campden powder before you add the yeast (I prefer Lalvin EC 1118 yeast). Many recipes say you can add the yeast after 12 hours. I did that for several years and I had some batches to fail. Since I've started waiting 24 hours before pitching the yeast I haven't had any batches to fail. Another thing I've discovered is that the bigger the batch the better the wine turns out. So I usually try to get up enough fruit to make a five gallon batch. Sometimes I have to settle for a three gallon batch. I no longer make one gallon batches.

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Eric C avatar
1 year ago #26
Eric C
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Also I recommend only using fining agents(gelatin,isinglass,egg whites) as a last resort. The reason I say this is because not only do they remove sediment they also remove flavor and color. I've found time is the best way to clear your wine and using a good recipe. When I first started making wine I had some difficulty with wines clearing, usually because of taking short cuts and not being cleanly and trying to make it on the cheap(not buying proper ingriedients, not using proper airlocks). I prefer cold crashing to fining agents.

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1 year ago #27
Bert
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If all this fails. Drink it cloudy.

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12 months ago #28
Bruno
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I never use chemicals never have.
I always find if you don't want to wait then cold will clear wines quicker.
Chill but not freeze and that will form sedement the clear wine can then be siphoned off or even poured out carefully leaving the last bit of wine with the sedement.

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10 months ago #29
Jeems
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Thanks to all of you, including those from 5 years ago+, there is a wealth of information, ideas, experiences, and good posts here. it is immensely helpful to many more people than you think i bet....i decided to take the time to tell you that and to thank you all, but im sure theres thousands more people who read it and dont say anything.

carry on!

Jeems

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6 months ago #30
Airiq
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WOW!!! My kind of girl!!! I've got a blood orange, blackberry and honey going...

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