[ 1 ] 2 Next >>
6 years ago #1
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

Hello everyone. I have enjoyed reading thousands of posts. Found this site about a week ago.

Note to admin: I had a lot of trouble with my registration, if someone could contact me at <email> maybe we can straighten it out.

Now for the actual question-

I am trying desperately to figure out a sugar ratio preferably using dextrose to safely make sparkling wine our of my current batch of strawberry. It is just the right amount of acidic that I think it would be fantastic with some bubbles.

So I don't want to make exploding glass hand grenades and lose eyes nose ears and hands. How much is a safe amount to put in? I plan on using crown caps and after riddling use the normal champagne type plastic caps with wires. Does anyone know how much a)regular sugar either per gallon or liter that should be added and b) how much more dextrose would be required, and if nobody knows maybe a guess based on recipes calling for priming sugar with a correction if cane sugar is used?

Answer
6 years ago #2
MaiTai
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 314
Votes: 5

Hello, DGreene welcome to the forum !


I don't understand. What problems did you encounter when registering?

Reply
6 years ago #3
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

Looks like to get the smallest bubbles safely you do about a cup of regular sugar to 20 L of wine fermented to around 10-12% or 1 3/4 cups to 6 gallons. Still would like to know the approximate amount ratio using corn sugar (dextrose)

Reply
6 years ago #4
MaiTai
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 314
Votes: 5

DGreene, as far as I know the amount of sugar used in making champagne decides for the sweet- or dryness of the wine. Not about non-exploding... This is a first I hear of it. I always thought using thicker bottles and string-corks were the deciding factor in having them not explode.

Reply
6 years ago #5
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

MaiTai-
Methode Traditional is the production of carbonation IN THE BOTTLE using additional yeast and sugar. The reason the bottles can explode, even champagne bottles, is that if you use too much sugar you end up with way too much pressure. Standard champagne is at about 6 atmospheres or around 90 PSI (pounds per square inch), and the bottles can take that, but more and you have a big problem. The dryness or sweetness of any alcohol is set AFTER fermentation is complete. When you make a sparkler in the traditional method you do add sugar after you disgourge the sediment, but you could also do it with some sort of non fermentable sweetner like saccarin or lactose I think works too. Dextrose is used as priming sugar in beer, I like to use it when I produce wine that I want a little more alcohol in because its a cleaner flavor, but regular cane sugar works too. In this case I was trying to figure out A) the safe level of sugaring for pressure/carbonation purposes and if there was a formula out there I could use to figure out the corrosponding amount of dextrose to sugar in any amount, but specifically to use for this batch of sparkling strawberry.
I made a sparkling chablis with a friend but he had done all the work, I just helped with the disgorge/dosage part.

Reply
6 years ago #6
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

Oh the addition of sugar at the end after disgorging the sediment is called a dosage (doughs ahge).
Usually a dosage is 2 parts wine (the wine you used for the sparkling wine) with 1 part wine conditioner (sweet plus sorbate) and one part brandy. You can do it without the brandy too. You could also just top it with the wine if you dont mind it being really dry, but it really depends on your taste I guess.

Reply
6 years ago #7
MaiTai
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 314
Votes: 5

Oh well, DGreene, you are DEFINITELY the expert here. I am learning a lot from you although I have been making wines for quite some time now (but not having been very adventurous with trying out new tastes/flavors/methods).

I am really happy you have joined us here and appreciate all your input and kind willingness to share your knowledge

Reply
6 years ago #8
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

Geeze Thanks MaiTai. I joined hoping to get some advice but I admit I like this forum. I have got some good ideas about other types of wine to make. Good place to trade recipes too I bet. Anyway sparkling wine is kinda advanced stuff, I was hoping the beer guys might know something about it or maybe someone made sparkling wine or cider here before.

Reply
6 years ago #9
MaiTai
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 314
Votes: 5

Yes, I am really sorry I couldn't help with that question but I think your hunch about the beer-guys probably having knowledge about that is correct. Now I hope they will show up in this thread and react

Ideas about other types of wine to make, DGreene? Now I am curious

Reply
6 years ago #10
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

Actually I found the amount of corn sugar to use in a book that I already OWN! Sheesh, the answer was right in front of me. In case anyone else reads this thread the MAXIMUM amount of CORN SUGAR (dextrose) is 4 LEVEL TEASPOONS per bottle. If you are doing it to a finished wine, you need to remember what your original specific gravity was, and anything over 1.080 you need to add 2 liters of water per each 0.010 over that amount for 6 gallons. So since I am making 3 gal I add one liter since I started at 1.090 spec grav. Since I used a burgandy region strain of yeast it still fermented pretty dry, but I am still going to stir in a package of EC1118 (champagne high alcohol tolerance yeast) and about a tsp to tbsp of yeast energizer to that after I rehydrate the yeast. Then bottle on top of the corn sugar and give it a shake in the bottle to mix. 2 months, riddle, and disgorge. Easy right? Probably not.

Ideas about other wines? Well I do a lot of kits, but I like strawberry wine, its got everything you need. Bouquet, taste, mouth feel.. almost a sophisticated wine. I have some other things I am planning to try this summer. I am going to transplant a bunch of wild strawberry plants from my parents house to my concrete container garden here in philly. I hear the wild ones make a superb wine. I am in a wine club and come september we are getting grapes from the california harvest. I plan on buying about 400 lbs of pino noir grapes and press them and use the juice to make real champagne. Other than that....

Reply
6 years ago #11
MaiTai
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 314
Votes: 5

DGreene, indeed... that doesn't sound like an easy wine to make. But an challenging one

you sound real excited from those ideas and that is contagious - I must say. A strawberry-wine sounds even more 'fruity' to me than others - but that must be because I love strawberries (and wine )

Reply
6 years ago #12
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

Actually I highly recommend you try to make a batch of strawberry. I can give you a recipe for 5 gallons if you like, or for one gallon and you can multiply. Strawberries make excellent wine, they are fine dry, you don't need to make it sweet to get that nose that says BAM strawberry!!! and it's slightly perfumey and complicated, but very very nice.

Also in case you are reading this close to the time I actually wrote this part, I suggest you all get on your game plan for California grape season, now is the time to get money together with your friends and decide what you are going to order, and start calling suppliers. Mid August to Mid September is the time you will get availability..

Reply
6 years ago #13
MaiTai
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 314
Votes: 5

Ah. I am located in Israel. We go more by the Golan grapes and fruits and less the American fruit sector for obvious reasons (the transportation and such) - thus I am sort of watching this more from the outside (the California grape season) -

I would love to make strawberry wine, but it will have to wait though - they are straight out of season here and only this winter will the first lot be "harvested" again

Reply
6 years ago #14
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

I'll post a recipe later today when I get home so you can refer to it later. What latitude is Israel located in? You are still above the tropic of cancer right?

Reply
6 years ago #15
MaiTai
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 314
Votes: 5

Great! I am looking forward to that, DGreene

We are 3130´ North of the Equator

Reply
6 years ago #16
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

Hmm so you are 10 degrees south of me, so the growing season should be roughly the same with precipitation being the deciding factor on harvest. Hmm.
Anyway this is late I know but I have been to the seashore and have not had time to get the recipe together for you, but I will post it a little later for you.

Reply
6 years ago #17
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

Ok MaiTai, here are 2 recipes, one is what I actually used for my current batch of Strawberry, the next is an approximation of what you would need for a one gallon batch, then you can just multiply.

Here is what I used- and it is in american pounds. Not imperial. Not metric. You have a computer so I figure you can get the conversion done but if you have trouble let me know.

Current batch of 5 gal-

18 Lbs. Strawberries
10 Lbs. Sugar (regular cane sugar not dextrose)
2 Tablespoons Yeast Nutrient
1 Teaspoon Pectic Enzyme
5 Teaspoons Acid Blend
1 Teaspoon Wine Tannin
5 Campden Tablets (I use 1/8 Teaspoon Potassium Metabisulfate as 1 tablet)
1 Package ICV D47 yeast.
Add water to reach 5 Gallons.

Start this with the fruit cut up with all the ingreadients except the water and the yeast in the primary mixed with just enough water to cover the berries.

Let it sit like that for 24 hours.

It's a good idea to rehydrate the yeast, in fact if you do that in about 1 Cup of 104 Degree Fahrenheit water with a 1/2 teaspoon yeast nutrient and a couple of tablespoons of sugar about 12 hours before the fermentation will start faster.

Add the rest of the water, stir like crazy, check your specific gravity it should be around 1.090. If it's higher make sure you have enough water. If lower add sugar.

Pitch the yeast and if you did the starter mix (nutrient and sugar) you can give it a stir.

Rack it off the lees when spec grav reaches 1.10 unless you are doing it at a low temp then do it at around 1.15

I use bentonite to clear mine but you can mess around with this a bit. Bentonite does clear it very well though.


1 Gallon Recipe

3.5 Lbs. Strawberries
2 Lbs. Sugar
1 Tsp Acid Blend
1/4 Tsp. Tannin
1/2 Tsp Pectic Enzyme
1 Tsp Nutrient
1/8 Tsp Potassium Metabisulfate or 1 Campden Tablet
Water To make 1 Gallon, probably about 14 or 15 Cups or so.
Wine yeast (obviously)
I have used ICV D47, also have used RC 212. My brewshop guy said to use EC 1118. Use something alcohol tolerant. You can make strawberry wine dry. Always ferment till dryness and then if you want it sweeter add stabilizers (potassium sorbate) and sweetner or wine condtioner or whatever.

Reply
6 years ago #18
MaiTai
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 314
Votes: 5

DGreene I have printed this out. This will be the first recipe I am going to try start winter (when the strawberries are available again here) Thank you sooooooo very much. I really appreciate it


By that time I will let you know how it went or if I stumble into any problems

Reply
6 years ago #19
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

Strawberry is pretty forgiving. Be patient, making fruit wine is nothing like making wine from a kit. It takes some patience. I started my current batch about 2 1/2 months ago, its spec grav is below 0.992 now, it still has a real real slow ferment going but I plan to bottle this wed, about 3 gallons in champagne bottles (with sugar etc to make the sparkling wine) and the rest in 1 gallon to start aging then I will bottle that later too.

Reply
6 years ago #20
MaiTai
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 314
Votes: 5

Thanks for the warning I hope everything goes according to plan and look forward to reading how it all turned out finally. The other -1 gallon- for how long will you wait?

Reply
6 years ago #21
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

Honestly I am not sure. I am adding EC1118 yeast, and since all of it will not be bottled with that some will end up in the original wine. I suppose I will let it sit for a month, I ended up with about 3 gallons since I ran out of champagne bottles. Probably a month, then into a 3 gal carboy with about 3 campden tablets, then another month in there then bottle. I guess I will add sorbate too I dunno. Was trying to construct a wine filter that worked to .5 microns but seems there is nothing available without a carbon component, and since I don't want to lose flavor I will wait on it and bottle without filtering or just bite the bullet and buy a buon vino minijet. They are only about 200 bucks and maybe I can convince my brew guy to get me one at wholesale. I would like to filter. SO like 2 or 3 months then bottle, one month to a 3 gal I want it to settle.

Reply
6 years ago #22
MaiTai
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 314
Votes: 5

Long time waiting to see if it turns out the way you intend to

Reply
6 years ago #23
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

Hey if you want to make something that is actually good then it takes a long time anyway. It will age and develop while I am waiting, so when I bottle really it will be ready to drink probably, though I will likely wait a month or three. Hell my Amarone will continue to bulk age for at least three months before I even bottle it, and it has been sitting in a carboy for 2 months now. Same with the supertuscan but that has been there for 3 already. Age in bulk is better for the wine. The supertuscan will have to be in the bottle for at LEAST a year before I even try it, though I do sample from the carboys about every month and a half to see what is happening, if something tastes off that way I can rack it off or whatever needs to be done.

Reply
6 years ago #24
MaiTai
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 314
Votes: 5

Ah, the sampling is a very good idea I didn't think about that...

You are right of course, I knew that

Reply
6 years ago #25
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21
Yeah Sampling is the best part..

Unless you sample too much
Reply
6 years ago #26
MaiTai
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 314
Votes: 5

Too much sampling can only be bad the day after

Reply
6 years ago #27
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

Yah tell me about it. We opened a couple of bottles of the Rioja last night. It was supposed just to be to see how it was getting along in the bottle, it's about 6 months old now or so, maybe 2 in the bottle or 2 1/2 whatever. It's friggin fantastic stuff, so we open another bottle and finish that one too. Now this morning I am feeling the effects and I don't mean the healthy antioxidants.

Reply
6 years ago #28
MaiTai
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 314
Votes: 5
The price to pay for having a good time (tasty time)
Reply
6 years ago #29
DGreene
Ace
Blogs: 2
Forum: 1,108
Votes: 21

As far as hangovers go it was not really a bad one. Maybe because I made the alcohol? I bottle my chablis tomorrow, and I have a bergamis kit that has been sitting around in cold storage for 2 months I think I am going to start.

Reply
6 years ago #30
MaiTai
Gold Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 314
Votes: 5

Yes, sure. Of course it makes a difference who made the alcohol

That sounds good. Will you update here (so I can follow step-by-step) or is this impertinent to ask?

Reply
By entering this site you declare you are 21 or older, you read and agreed to its Terms, Rules & Privacy and you understand that your use of the site's content is made at your own risk and responsibility.
Copyright © 2006 - 2015 Drinks Planet